The Great Days of Radio

Common Topics discuss everything from supported file formats used with DRS 2006 radio automation, how to import 3rd party playlists, catching satellite feeds and much, much more.

The Great Days of Radio

Postby Stashu » Thu Aug 26, 2010 6:35 am

In the Support section, Major Logan was telling of his experiences in the past in Broadcasting.
Let me say that I miss what radio was.
It was vibrant, alive, filled with great music, information, and personalities that made your day. I'm glad to have been a part of that great time. My best years on the radio were from 1973 to 1984. An AOR/Top 40 AM station and a full fledged FM Rocker. We had a 2000 song playlist and could play extra LP cuts at times. The emphasis was on personality, and entertainment, and information. We did 8 to 12 live breaks per hour, live commercial reads, live tags to recorded spots, and got to jooke around with the news people on the air. And we ran newscasts once an hour 24 hours a day on our AM.
A different time, but a great one.
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Postby Stashu » Thu Aug 26, 2010 6:42 am

Major Logan, I hope you don't mind, but I enjoyed your note so much I decided to start a thread with this topic.

Here's a clip from Major Logan's reply on the Support Section:

As far as my background, this is another common occurance it seems. A lot of us have similar backgrounds and obviously the same type interests. I grew up in radio and spent over 26 years in all capacities. I've worked mostly Mornings or Afternoon Drive, served as Music Director, Program Director, Production Director, Creative Services Director, Operations Mgr, General Manager and I may have swept a floor occaisionaly. I have my own "Voice-over" and production studio along with my DRS2006 "hobbies". When you have a voice, you can always work!

Long live the "Real" Broadcasters, who actually have seen the transmitter and tower site, knows how to "pick" hit records, how to cut a spot that "sells" and how to "build" an audience.

How many new broadcasters have the chance to earn an RIAA Certified "Gold Record", just as the artist receives, because you took a chance on playing a new record that eventually became a "million seller"? How many have the opportunity to win ADDY awards for creative commercial writing and production, or get to see their Arbitron ratings take them to #1 in their time-slot. There used to be more "individual" creativity before everything became "rubber stamped" from the "home office" and the local broadcasters became simply "implementers" instead of "innovators".
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Postby Major Logan » Fri Aug 27, 2010 3:44 am

I am a Business Advisor & Instructor today, in addition to my production work. It's obvious to my students I have been in radio. One of the things I teach is how to maximize your potential. I ask them if they were in radio...what kind of station would they work at? They start telling me "country", "rock" or "hip-hop". Then I remind them of the question. I said what kind would you "work" at. Meaning are you going to just be a DJ (a term most true broadcasters cringe at being called), or is this a career? In order to be a true broadcaster I tell them it should not matter what they play.....it matters what they PAY! Obviously playing the music you like is a bonus but it limits your ability to grow as a broadcaster and can limit your income possibilities. So, I learned to play "country", "new country", "AOR", "MOR", "Beautiful Music", "R&B", "Hip-Hop", "Top40", "CHR", "AC", "Hot AC", "Gospel", "Urban" and the list goes on. I was never without a job. I followed the engineers around and learned what a "compressor/limiter" does and the difference in an "Exiter" and "Modulation Monitor". I knew how to read the transmitter plate current and plate voltage and how to calculate the "phase ratio" of a directional antenna array. I knew how many sale items from a Piggly Wiggly newspaper ad I could fit into a .30 sec spot. I learned how to pronouce "Yitzhak Rabine" while reading news copy from the AP wire (not to mention how to put on a new ink ribbon). I knew exactly how much pressure and what part of the console I could use to to tear a straight line of copy without ripping it to shreds. Now that was a technique!

Before everything became so "niche" oriented and segmented one single "broadcaster" could be an "Air Personality", News person, music director, programmer, engineer, play-by-play announcer, promoter, interviewer, advertising pitch man.....all at the same time at the same station. To me being a true broadcaster was about more than just the music. It was everything!
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35 Years in the biz....

Postby TSNSports » Fri Sep 10, 2010 4:18 am

And bot do I miss those good ole days. I have managed to stay in the business I have made my life.

I was in the business when you were required to have a license. I went to Atlanta, Georgia where the FCC had a regional office. We took the 3rd Class Radiotelephone test. It was mainly common sense and some technical questions too. In the old days we had to read the transmitter meters and log down readings every three-hours.

When the FCC passed a monority regulation they did away with the test. People were failing it and couldn't qualify to work with the equipment.

As it pertains to programing, we played the format, but what we wanted to play...as others have said we had live sets five or six times an hour. That was the days of the 45rpm and LP. Just thinking alot of the young folks are probably scratching their heads right now, 45?, LP?, lolol.

IT WAS A FUN TIME WHEN IT WAS SIMPLE....Now corporate radio has taken over. They use to could only own 1-AM, 1-FM and a TV station per city...now they own five and six stations in a market.
What I use to hear on a nearby classic rock station, I never hear on the one now owned by the big corporation.

Thats the reason we have started a new online FM type station. We are building the music library and we'll be playing the old hits, album cuts, deep album cuts, new and old country and some R&B.
Check it out at www.muletownradiofm.com. Take care all and all the best to ya!!!!!
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Postby Major Logan » Fri Sep 10, 2010 6:52 am

You hit the nail on the head Mr TSNSports...dude? We used to have to "qualify" to be in radio and we took it seriously. I also took my 3rd Class Radiotelephone with Broadcast Endorsement test at the Atlanta FCC field office..on one of the many Peachtree Streets they have there. Remember the rule...if you were caught cheating on the test...you would be banned from broadcasting "for life"! Scared the crap out of me. There was one goofy question on my test I will never forget, "Where do you keep the ship's log to keep if from getting wet?" What?!
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Postby Stashu » Wed Oct 06, 2010 9:39 pm

Element 9 was the bear. It even involved a pencil, a sheet of paper and math. No calculators.
When they deregulated the exam, and eventually everything, you just sent in $0.50 and a cereal box top, and you got your license. The license used to be an ornate Certificate. Now, it's a small wallet sized Guv'mint form.
I'm in the middle of puling out memorabilia for a station reunion.
I'm amazed at what they are [u]not [/u]doing in radio-land these days.
450 song playlists, no news, no information. I'll tell you in a future thread what my professor in college predicted. Eerie how accurate he was.
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Re: The Great Days of Radio

Postby richdevlin761 » Thu Dec 12, 2013 8:15 pm

When the FCC passed a monority regulation they did away with the test. People were failing it and couldn't qualify to work with the equipment. As it pertains to programing, we played the format, but what we wanted to play...as others have said we had live sets five or six times an hour. That was the days of the 45rpm and LP. Just thinking alot of the young folks are probably scratching their heads right now, 45?, LP?, lolol.
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